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years ago that the national security agency was tapping chancellor angela merkel's mobile phone. that contradicts reports he told her he was unaware. nhk world's noriko okada has more. >> reporter: the german newspaper is the latest media source to publish details of how the u.s. spied on german chancellor angela merkel. it spoke to a u.s. intelligence worker involved in the operation. it says that person revealed the head of the national security agency informed the president obama in person about the surveillance in 2010. the paper quoted the source as saying obama did not stop the operation. nearly a week ago, german government officials said u.s. intelligence agency may have monitored merkel's mobile phone. she called the president to demand an explanation. >> translator: i told him that tapping is a clear violation of law. >> reporter: president obama has been denying he knew about the operation. his press secretary is appealing for calm. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring, and will not monitor the communications of the chancell
as more spying allegations are come to go light. "el mundo" report that national security agency spied there as well. they will now summon an explanation. it comes as an european delegation is visiting the u.s. >> reporter: erica ferrari has more. >> reporter: a nine member of european lawmakers will be in washington this week seeking sense. they'll meet with u.s. government and intelligence officials overall gas stations of widespread spying by the national security agency against e.u. leaders. allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. >> i can tell you that the president assured the chancellor that the u.s. is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancell chancellor. >> reporter: and it's not just the european who is are upset. over the weekend thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> we're against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> reporter: the allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policies with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelation from snowdon and t
michael hayden who ran the national security agency when some of our allies phones were attacked. we'll get analysis from david ignatious of the "washington post," david sanger of the "new york times." cbs news chief legal correspondent jan crawford and cbs news political director john dickerson. as we approach the 50th anniversary of the kennedy assassination we'll talk to former "life" magazine editor dick stolen and granddaughter of abe da bra ma'am zaputa it's a lot but that's what we do at "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning again we welcome to the broadcast the chairman of the senate intelligence committee california senator diane feinstein. thank you so much, senator, for coming. you have been a big defender from the beginning of the national security agency but you were clearly upset with the revelation that we were tapping german chancellor angla merkel's cell phone, you said it was a big problem that the empty was unaware. do you believe that that the president didn't know this was happening? >> i can't answer that. i don't know. but i think where allies are
" says the u.s. national security agency and the central intelligence agency used a joint program called the special collections service. the magazine report says agents installed about 80 high-performance antennas to capture records of mobile phone, online, and satellite communications. the article mentions 80 locations. 19 of them are in europe. the targets were allegedly classified into a five-scale list that was reviewed every 18 months by the staff of the white house and the secret services. >>> international experts overseeing chemical weapons in syria may have missed a deadline. the inspectors arrived at the beginning of the month. they had been checking 23 facilities used to store chemical agents. they've been negotiating to get into those facilities. officials with the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons haven't said how the inspectors did it on sunday or whether they met their goal. the syrian government has met one of their deadlines. and they plan to destroy the arsenal. experts will spend the next few weeks drawing up their own plans. they hope to dispose of
as new spying revelations come to light. el mundo reported that the national security agency spied on 60 million phone conversations there alone. it comes as an european delegation now visiting the u.s. al jazeera now join us from the white house. how has the white house responded to these latest allegations of spying on world leaders. >> reporter: as far as the latest allegations on the spanish, the millions of spanish who have been monitored by the nsa, nothing yet. we have a briefing coming up in an hour or so where we expect questions to be asked. as far as previous allegations we have an anonymous leak to the wall street journal saying that president obama knew nothing about this until this summer when he had an internal review--there wasn't an internal review, he found about it then and immediately put a stop to the spying on german chancellor angela merkel. but other reports say that he knew about the surveillance of angela merkel in 2010. there have been rumbles of how the european governments could be careful because edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation
the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries, even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came from the former foreign minister of france. he said in a radio interview, let's be honest. we eavesdrop, too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add, "we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous." america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sens
national security. >> reporter: the head of the national security agency will testify before the house intelligence committee tomorrow. later this week, german officials will meet here at the white house with top presidential advisors to seek written guarantees that u.s. surveillance of their government and its leaders is over for good. >> pelley: major, thanks very much. criticism this month of the affordable care act has focused largely on the trouble with that people are having signing up for insurance online. but the problems with the law that the president himself calls obamacare go far beyond the government website. and dean reynolds has been digging into this. >> reporter: the calls insurance broker rich fawn is getting these days are coming from both his business and individual customers. >> nobody fully has a complete 100% understanding of the affordable care act. >> reporter: nobody knows how many people will participate, he says, so insurance companies are offering higher premiums than many anticipated until things settle downs do annoyance of his customers. >> because the a
of protests over surveillance by the u.s. national security agency. spain joins france, germany, brazil and mexico. last week, we told you that the german head of government, angela merkel, called president obama to tell him to stop listening to her cell phone. late today, the chairwoman of the senate intelligence committee, dianne feinstein, said she is "totally opposed to spying on allies." well, no eavesdropping was required for u.s. officials to get an earful from european representatives in washington today. here's state department correspondent margaret brennan. >> reporter: members of the european parliament arrived for a closed-door meeting with house intelligence committee chairman mike rogers this morning. but the explanation they got did not satisfy germany's elmar brok who said the wiretapping of angela merkel's phone was a criminal act. >> if we have the feeling that your closest allies are spying on you, it's difficult to talk to such an ally in an open way anymore and i think we have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism but not spying on friends
national security agency >>> good evening. welcome to al jazeera america. i'm john siegenthaler in new york. tough new abortion restrictions and taxes are likely to wind up before the u.s. supreme court reacts from state with bipartison support. also tonight - i always tell people if they want to dozens of people tweeting the name. >> finding hate on line. the >> >> >>> we gee bin tonight with a federal judge's decision to stop controversial restrictions on an abortion in texas. it comes hours before the new rule is to go into effect. a federal ruling >> it's not just a human rights privacy issue, encryption is being compromised. that is a commercial issue. >> we are asking where we are making deals like swift and all these things, that we get to the truth. you have too re-establish trust. this is important. secondly we are saying get proportionality we are not expecting admissions tomorrow, but let's start a process of some accountability. we have member states with bad accountability in relation to service, and surveillance. we have a problem, and we are dealing with that too
a spanish newspaper record that claims the national security agency monitored tens of millions of phone calls there. once again the white house is on the defensive about perhaps which have caused a rift with its alleys. this starts our coverage. >> another day, another embarrassment, another american ambassador simmondsed to see angry european -- sum oned to see angry utep officials. >> the newspaper on monday revealed large scale american intelligence gathering in spain. as many as 60 million phone alls scooped up in one month alone. they met congressional leaders in washington to discuss the surveillance. >> many of my colleagues are angry and disturbed that friends are spying are friend. you have to register the anger of my german colleagues and others who don't feel that should be the case. >> the revelations keep coming, and they are acutely embarrassing for washington. there is already a review of the way in which intelligence my be gathered. but the administration is quick to defend the need for large-scale intelligence gathering. >> the work that is being done here saves lives a
security agency is on the defensive on multiple fronts. the nsa surveillance practices at home and abroad have been front page news afte after the s from nsa contractor edward snowdon. now, bills are in the works in the house and senate that would rein in the spy masters. tonight on inside story we'll take a closer look at the nsa since 9/11, including its mission, it's practices, and it's future. but first this background. >> director keith alexander. >> reporter: demand for intelligence gathering reform are growing on capitol hill over the wake of revelations of massive information gathering. there has been crafted buy partisan legislation to end the collection of puck phone records and the government only focus on foreigners who pose threats. 12 years later the continuing disclosures of nsa surveillance has pushed them to try to rein in the broad sweep of intelligence gathering. appearing on pbs last night. >> there has to be a balance between privacy and security. the nsa and their supporters in the congress have said let's forget about privacy. let's forget about civil liberties. i c
newspaper says the national security agency tracked millions of phone calls. reporters for el mundo said they logged 60 million calls last december and january. they say the agents tracked the numbers of calls and where they took place. they say the agency did not store the content of the calls. the reporters cited classified documents provided by former nsa contractor edward snowden. spanish government officials summoned the u.s. ambassador for an explanation. spanish law prohibits the collecting of such information without permission. >>> german media are reporting that agents also bugged chancellor angela merkel's phone. u.s. officials have not denied the allegation but say no such surveillance is taking place now. they say they're conducting a review of their intelligence gathering methods. >> i noted the other day a readout from a phone call the president had with chancellor merkel made clear that we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> carney said last summer president barack obama ordered a comprehensive review of how the u.s. gathers intelligence. he sa
of the national security agency is denying reports that he discussed operations involving merkel with president obama. susan mcginnis is in washington. susan, good morning. >> good morning, anne-marie. you know, many here seem unfazed by word of this kind of monitoring. one congressman hinted that the reaction is simply because the information is now out in the public realm, but this european delegation is here, they will be meeting with white house officials, and one big question is what did president obama know and when. a european union delegation is in d.c. this morning to meet with white house aides and members of congress. they're expressing outrage at reports the nsa has been eavesdropping on as many as 35 world leaders. >> i think we have repair work to do, and i think we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what's really happening in this program. >> reporter: the visit comes on the heels of a german newspaper which says the u.s. listened in on angel a merkel's phone calls since 1992. the obama administration denies it saying news reports claiming otherwise are not true
government stops watching us. >> former national security agency whistleblower, strake speaking saturday at the stop watching us rally. he was charged with espionage after he was suspected of revealing information about the agency's warrantless wiretapping program. original charges against him were dropped. former republican governor of new mexico gary johnson also addressed the crowd. >> the government has granted itself power that it does not have. [applause] we have to stand against this. forla merkel, thank you bringing attention to the world that the u.s. is monitoring the .ell phones of 35 world leaders thank you for allowing us to recognize that 70 million cell phone conversations in france every month are being monitored. edward snowden, thank you -- [applause] thank you for bringing to the attention of the world the fact the u.s. government, the nsa is engaged in massive information gathering. 125 billion cell phone conversations a month. judge's granting legal authority 113the nsa to monitor million verizon users. this is not due process. >> former republican governor of new me
that the national security agency is opening the laws and regulations that we put on them. we probably need to be able to have more transparency about what the foreign surveillance court is up to so that we can lay to rest the accusation that they are just a rubber stamp or that they don't actively double check what the national security agency is up to. so we have a communications challenge that we have got to get out there. that is not to say there is not substance. it is going to be debated. reasonable people can come down on either side of the debate, but that is what is going to be going on in congress this fall is trying to reconcile all of these competing interests. host: michael from las vegas, independent line, hi. caller: as i was telling the person who took my call, i ran who a chap in las vegas gave me suspicion that he might be a terrorist. i tried to call home and security, and it was impossible to get through. nobody answered the phone. i try to get a letter to them, i cannot get any communication. now, what does one do in a case like that? i had a very serious reason why thi
european country ticked off at the u.s., specifically the national security agency, and today, it was our ally in madrid. the spanish secretary of state for the european union summoning our ambassador for a dressing-down over recent published allegations they national security agency collected data from 60 million phone calls in spain within a 30-day period last year. afterward, the country's foreign mill -- minister explained the stakes for the session. >> question asked the ambassador that he facilitates to the government all the necessary information about these concerns. which the event they are confirmed would mean a rupture in the climate of confidence which traditionally existed in the relations between our two countries. >> president obama mostly deflects dueling reports assaulting the president knew about the spying on german chancellor angela merkel three years ago and greenlighted it to continue. another report saying that mr. obama was kept in the dark about the spying on merkel for five years before learning of is this summer and oring an end to it. jay corney would not comme
of national intelligence and general keith alexander, the head of the national security agency, the nsa, will be testifying answering questions, presumably about the nsa surveilance program including reports over the past few days that the u.s. has been spying on allied leaders, including monitoring the personal cell phone of the german chancellor angela merkel. we'll monitor what's going on, bring you the highlights. stand by for that. right now he's just opening up the hearing. meanwhile, president obama is being hammered on many fronts right now. how much did he know about the surveilance of friendly allies? why didn't he know about the problems that were going to plague the health care website? i want you to listen to part of the new article from cnn's chief political analyst gloria borger she just wrote and posted on cnn.com. i'll read you a line. the ultimate irony may be this. a president who extols the virtues of government has now been sucked into the big government vortex experiencing up close and personal as they say what it feels like to lose control to the bureaucrats. the
, the problem is we're not getting the full story out of the national security agency. if they had been simply running through spanish calls looking for particular terrorists over the course of a month, 60 million called is no big deal. it's almost acceptable. i think the shock for most people is that the united states allowed this to be leaked out in documented. that's what the french and germans and spanish are reacting to. now as for listening, to heads of state, that's something else. and frankly it would be highly unusual for the national security agency to monitor the chancellor of germany's phone and not tell the president early on. that would be completely opposite standard operating procedure. >> and that's what the "the wall street journal" is saying this morning citing several sources that the president wasn't notified of this. you have called this the worst damage to u.s. intelligence in 30 or 40 years. with a it worth it? >> absolutely not. look, the national security agency, i depended upon it for my entire career. it's got brilliant information when it comes to counterterrorism.
security agency is conducting surveillance, on american citizens within the united states. specifically under the u.s. patriot act which was passed after 9/11, and the national intelligence directors, clapper, james clapper and alexander will be trying to describe to what degrees they have complied with the law. they insist and they just recently actually overnight released several declassified documents trying to show that they have been complied with the directives of the secret u.s. foreign surveillance intelligence court. and that in one instance, several instances where they did exceed the boundaries allowed by that court, that they pulled back, and subsequently, the court approved their methods. so again, this is -- this won't necessarily deal with the extent with which american intelligence agencies are actually spying on foreign leaders. >> okay, tom ackerman, thank you very much, indeed. >> was it a simple car crash or a point to drive home a point by choinchinese ethnic minority? in china am teenen men square. reporting from hong kong. >> around the square normally subjected t
of the national security agency says reports of widespread phone tapping overseas are not true. meanwhile, a proposed bill in congress would sale back some of the n.a.a.'s powers. >> confident and almost defiant, the nation's top spy chiefs made no apologies, vigorously defending the job they do to keep america and its allies safe. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forget this. they continued to try. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. natio
spokesperson, says, general alexander, head of the national security agency did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations chancellor merkel. the president reportedly apologized to merkel who grew up in east germany under the eyes and ears of the sassi. he said he would have stopped the bugging if he had known about it. lawmakers say new leaks from edward snowden about the u.s. intercepting phone calls from other officials are really hurting relations. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we have listened in. so i think we have repair work to do. bill: brazil's president canceled a state visit over nsa leaks that indicated her phone calls had been listened to. bill? bill: what is the white house going to respond to or how will it respond now to these leaks, wendell? >> reporter: as they dribble ou
're watching "worldwide exchange." >>> the national security agency has denied that president barack obama was told that he was spying on the phone of angela merkel. they claim the president was informed by the nsa chief in 2010 that it had bugged the phone of the chancellor and he didn't stop the operation because he didn't trust her. trust her with what? annette has the information. i've always assumed, annette, that we're all spying on each other. we have this big listening post called gchq and what is it there for if not to listen to people. the mistake the u.s. made was they wrote it on paper. once you have a record of it, you have to complain. >> that's true. the german constitution states that the u.s. secret service agencies are allowed to spy on german soil and they, as well, might be allowed to spy on angela merkel. so everybody who is now screaming that's against the law might not really be right. but let me reiterate what we are as well having in terms of reports coming out from the wall street journal. they are saying that president obama was informed about the spying on angel
in the u.k. has been overshadowed by reports of spying by america's national security agency. according to nsa leaker eric snowden, there has been eavesdropping. the e.u. envoy will arrive in washington. >> reporter: that's right, they'll be joined by members of congress, think tanks and telephone companies to discuss the surveillance of citizens. this is a delegation that had been organized some months ago. the european parliament had set up an inquiry as a result of the news from eric snowden. we are expecting some sort of emergency delegation of intelligence officials from both germany and france to washington in the next few days to have talks, but we're not sure when that is going to happen. as for whether they're going to get any joy through congress we heard that europe should be grateful for the surveillance, it's keeping europe safe. we're not sure what you all are complaining about. >> they have also said that the french and the germans spy on the usa so don't be surprised we do it to you. this is quite interesting. angela merkel, apparently she has been bugged, if you like, f
at the level of the national security agency and the way the protocols are set up at this point, that's sort of where the line of information would stop. there isn't necessarily a reason why they would tell the white house there's no protocol that insists that they do. and in the case of the monitoring the chancellor merkel and some 35 other leaders, nsa hadn't brought it to the white house's attention. >> the dates are significant because the monitoring dates go back to 2002 on angela merkel, which also would explain from the officials quoted here why the president would not be brought into the loop on this. as bizarre as that sounds to some people. >> at what level it sounds a little odd. you could see a situation where a program starts as far back as 2002 and keeps -- nsa is a very large organization with incredibly monitoring surveillance programs and these things kind of have -- unless someone puts a stop to them. >> many are processing what this means to the world and the u.s. reputation as we know european leaders are quite angry over these revelations. i want to play with european pa
to tell me the national security agency had the power to spy on whomever they pleased and may have taken advantage of that power? >> you can bet nsa surveillance will be a topic of conversation when they meet with secretary of state john kerry in the oval office. a delegation of european participate parliament officials met with mike rogers to discuss reports that the u.s. is collecting data from their citizens and spied on world leaders from 35 different countries, including the personal cell phone the german angela merkel for more than a decade. the nsa went on record to say that the president did not know about it. it makes me feel worse actually. the president has been forced to apologize not only to merkel but france's president and brazil's president. the eu is threatening to cancel pending trade talks. thanks, edward snowden, we appreciate it. let's spin. there's a lot of directions to go. one of the dynamic that's really interesting, to consider president obama's position here, i think we've all been trying to figure out where exactly he stands. he's been hawkish in some ways and
that the national security agency tapped the phones or intercepted messages from the leaders of 35 countries. that includes a lot of the u.s. allies. >> a lot of people are offended. brazil and mexico lodging complaints about the u.s., spying on them. in europe, friends including germany, france and spain, they're furious. a spanish newspaper reporting today that the nsa scanned 60 million phone calls in spain. get this, in a period of one month, be december last year to january. >> we've got correspondents around the world covering the blowback that is facing the united states. first up, want to check in reaction from spain where as we said, the claim 60 million intercepts. al goodman is joining us from madrid. >> reporter: suzanne, there is the spanish government summoned the u.s. ambassador to madrid to give an explanation. that happened earlier. afterwards, the spanish foreign ministry issued a statement warning washington there has to be a balance between security and the right of the citizens to have privacy. so there is in their communications so there is a warning shot across the bow
.s. ambassador i had intimate knowledge of some of the things that the national security agency was doing, so let's at least understand several things. the nsa will vacuum up anything and everything they can get their hands on because no one, no one other than the president and his top national security adviser, can tell them not to do something, so that's point one. point two, the damage that has been done to american economic interests as a result of this revelation is as important as the foreign policy consequences, because what european company will want to use american networking capacity and other types of computer technologies as a result of this. finally, one other thing. i'm really embarrassed for this white house. i feel awfully sorry for the president because this is basically going to undermine the -- our transatlantic alliance for many years to come, just at a time when we're negotiating an iran agreement. where our european allies are so important to us. >> meanwhile there are some republican leaders coming out, republican congressman peter king defending the u.s. spying on world le
allegations of national security agency has been spying on them. early early i spoke with the former u.s. ambassador to nato about whether the reaction is for their people or if it is personal. >> i don't think we should discount the personal feeling of violation that someone like chancellor merkel has. when she realizes it's her very own cell phone that she has in her hand that's being listened to. i can see that there is a personnelment to this and a genuine reaction, but from the establishments in european governments a lot of this is for public con zukauskus. the publics are upset so the government needs to show that they are upset. and it's also convenient for the government to his deflect everything towards blaming the united states rather than having anyone scrutinize what they do. >> let's zero in on chancellor merkel an al annal an ali. how much is going to need to be done for her to be satisfied? what has to happen? what left of the transparency -- does she want to know what do you have? toll at that time? >> i wouldn't say that each and every communication is asking for too
more disclosures linked to the national security agency. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> in madrid the u.s. ambassador to spain james crossoes ignored shouted questions about how his meeting at the foreign ministry went. he had been summoned after the newspaper el mundo reported the nsa tracked more than 60 million phone calls in spain just from december 2012 to january 2013. meanwhile in washington members of the european parliament met with the house intelligence committee on u.s. surveillance. >> it's just about trust. for the european union to restore this trust to make sense of why the nsa surveillance was necessary, why it's so disproportionate. >> there have already been revelations that the nsa collected the phone call gait of french and german citizens and of ger pan chancellor angela merkel. over the weekend the german newspaper said merkel's phone was monitored as early as 2002. and another german paper said president obama was briefed about the effort in 2010, much earlier than previously reported. the nsa denied mr. obama was briefed that far bac
following a bashlash over reports the national security agency has tracked phone calls of dozens of world leaders. >> we recognize there need to be additional constraints how we gather and use intelligence. and it's in the context of this dynamic technology environment that the president has directed us to review our surveillance capabilities. >> one report from a german tabloid indicated that president obama knew that the nsa was tapping the phone of the german chance explore he allowed it to continue, again, german tabloid, a spokeswoman for the agency says that is simply not true. and "the wall street journal" reports the nsa stop monitoring chancellor merkel and other leaders after a white house review uncovered the operations. "the wall street journal" again. meanwhile, a state department spokeswoman says our ambassador to spain met with officials there to discuss reports that the nsa tracked more than 60 million phone calls in that country in one month. dana perino was the press secretary under george w. bush, the 43rd, president bush, 43, and this was happening under bush 43rd. >>
the national security agency spying scandal, for want of a better word. all this news that the u.s. conducted surveillance on our own allies. some of the documents posted by or leaked by edward snowden to the media indicate that these programs started in 2002. why spy on an ally? >> jake, if there were such a program, it would be classified and i couldn't talk about it. it would be totally inappropriate, and i haven't been in the loop now obviously for more than four years. so it's just one of those subjects i couldn't discuss. >> without getting specific, on a theoretical basis, what is the interest of the united states in conducting surveillance on a country who is a clear ally of the united states? >> i've got to go with the answer i have given you. let me say this. we do have a fantastic intelligence capability worldwide against all kinds of potential issues and concerns. we are vulnerable, as was shown on 9/11, and you never know what you're going to need when you need it. the fact is, we do collect a lot of intelligence and without speaking about any particular target or group of target
problems. when we found mistakes we reported, addressed and corrected them. the national security agency specifically is part of the intelligence community broadly is an honorable institution. the men and women who do this work are honorable people dedicated to conducting their mission lawfully and appalled by any wrongdoing. they, too, are citizens of this nation who care just as much about privacy and constitutional rights as the rest of us. they should be commended for their crucial important work in protecting the people of the country, which has been made all the more difficult by this torrent of unauthorized damaging disclosures. that all said, we in the ic stand ready to work in partnership with you to just surveillance authorities to further protect our privacy and civil liberties. i think there's some principles we already agree on. first we must protect sources, methods, targets, partners, sources, liaisons and relationships. we must do a better job helping american people understand what we do, why we do it and rigorous oversight that helps ensure we do it correctly. third we
the national security agency listened in on angela merkel's private calls. >>> congressional negotiators will try to find a compromise on the budget. house and senate negotiators sitting down today for the first formal negotiations to sign a budget deal before the temporary budget expires on january 15. >> the cardinals are waking up in boston this morning after spending 7 hours on the tarmac in st. louis. a mechanical problems grounded the team's chartered plane and delta airline officials said it took tyke to get a crew and plane that was the right size. tonight is game 6 in the world series. >>> hundreds of people packing a church in santa rosa to mourn the death of 13-year-old andy lopez yesterday. he was killed by a sonoma county sheriff's deputies last week who thought lopez was carrying a real gun but it was a pellet gun. a bill may pass that will require all tower guns to look like toys to make them translucent or colored. >>> about 100 people are searching for a san jose man missing since headed for the sierra to mine for gold. 65-year-old walter steever left on his trip a week
crossed the line at times. the admission followed disclosures that the national security agency monitored german chancellor angela merkel's communications, and tracked phone calls and e-mails across europe. kerry addressed the issue, over video link, for a conference in london. >> in some cases i acknowledge to you, as has the president, some of these actions have reached too far and we are going to make sure that that does not happen in the future. >> woodruff: kerry said he and president obama learned of some of the surveillance after the fact. but he also said some of the information gleaned has saved lives. one third of all the texas clinics that perform abortions are now barred from doing so. a federal appeals court last night allowed new state restrictions to take effect, pending further appeals. the rules say clinic doctors must have admitting privileges at nearby hospitals, but many do not. texas is one of a number of states to approve broad new curbs on abortions in recent months. in economic news, u.s. factory output expanded in october, at the best pace in two and half years. t
security agency tracked everyone's phone calls. in order to identify 300 suspects. we had to track according to the disclosures, 300 million people's activities. it doesn't seem right. it seems like overreach. over and over again this needs to be organized. there are legitimate uses of this. this is clearly overstep. in this particular case, we assume that there was monitoring between different computer systems. with enkrepgcryptioencryption. we can stop it. >> google is calling this overreach. you're clearly angry about this. >> we are. >> amanpour, they stake their reputations on the ability to safeguard information users here. there are a lot of people who are very upset with what they're learning. is this genuine here? is this genuine backlash we're hearing from world leaders and how this is going to impact our relationship with others? >> well, i think a lot of it is gen genuine. some of it they have to say these kinds of things because of the public outrage, the heard the google chairman say they were outraged and they've complained many times to the nsa, to congress to presi
? >> brooke, you're absolutely right. we cannot dispense what the national security agency -- i spent my entire career going after human sources. at the end of the day, it was the national security agency which kept us safe. let's don't damage this organization. let's just try to clean it up. >> bob baer, thank you very much. and the name marilyn tavenner may not ring a bell with anyone, but she's in the spotlight today. she's in charge of the agency that created the healthcare.gov website. the very same website that has been universally criticized and mocked ever since it went live. today's hearing started with "i'm sorry." >> we know that consumers are eager to purchase this coverage, and to the millions of americans who have attempted to use healthcare.gov to shop and enroll in healthcare coverage, i want to apologize to you that the website has not worked as well as it should. >> from there, marilyn tavenner offered a steady defense of the overall obama care program. the website will be fixed, she promised, and in the long run more americans will have better coverage. cnn investigati
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